Tuesday, January 08, 2008

3 Petty’s on a Mule



These siblings are the kids of Jim and Lillie Henry Petty. They are my mother’s first cousins.

The one up front is Billy. He died in 1974 and married to Mary. That is about all I know of him, which I got off his tombstone in the family plot.

The middle kid is Glen. Glen grew up and became a doctor and lived in the exclusive area of Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga. He died in the early 2000s. His daughter graduated from West Point in the ‘70s, and had plans afterwards for her and her brother to bike from Maine to Florida before she went into the Army as an officer.

The girl on the back is probably one of their four sisters.

The picture was taken at the old home place in Crandall, Georgia, which is between Chatsworth, Georgia, and Cleveland, Tennessee.

I remember visiting the house in the background several times while growing up. It was across the road (Jim Petty Road) from another son Cecil. A few years ago when I was in the area photographing family tombstones I saw that the house was full of bales of hay. You could see the hay in the windows, in the doors, and stacked on the porch.

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5 Comments:

Blogger deborah wilson said...

Good old photo - is that a wringer washer on the back porch?

8:06 PM  
Blogger ET said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

2:07 AM  
Blogger ET said...

Deborah,
Yes, I believe so.
Now that you mention it, my first cousin, that also lived in the same county, not far away, when she was a little girl got her arm caught in the wringer and her arm looked mangled for years. I saw her at a funeral this year and her arm looked fine - 60 years later.

2:10 AM  
Blogger deborah wilson said...

Yikes!

Yeah, I remember my paternal grandmother's wringer, and those washers were dangerous. Having to hand-feed the clothes through the wringer after washing and rinsing probably crushed/broke a lot of fingers, hands and arms. My grandmother never would let me near it.

Those washers are antiques now. Back in the day, I guess women considered them to be a big step up from having to wash by hand on an old galvinized scrub board! (I've done my share already!)

10:25 AM  
Blogger ET said...

Deborah,
I remember when I was a kid from time to time seeing other kids with the skin of the inside of their arms all twisted and winkled... they that their arms caught in the wringer. That must have been a horrible feeling.
My mother thought she was something when Daddy bought her one - almost like I did when Dupres delivered our first tv - a console - wood cabinet.

11:34 AM  

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