Sunday, June 30, 2019

Glover Park, Sept 2018, Starring Benjamin














PROUD TINA




This morning on the CBS SUNDAY MORNING NEWS SHOW was a feature on Tina Turner.  Wow!  She hasn’t hardly changed at all over he past 54 years when I saw her in person at the Royal Peacock in Atlanta.
July 10, 1965, I arrived home from a two-year active duty obligation in the Navy.  Within two or three days I got with old friends Monty and Johnnie and went to Atlanta to the Royal Peacock, a predominantly black club. This was on the eve of Georgia’s integration.
Ike and Tina Turner were the headliners.  Their music was well known, top 40 type.
If I remember correctly The Royal Peacock did not sell booze but you were welcome to bring your own, if you bought their ice and mixers.  We and a table of Tech students were the only white people there.
Ike, Tina, and the Ikettes came out at hyper high loud rhythmic energy.  The action and music were high pace.  It makes you want to jump up and start clapping and dancing.   Again, if I remember correctly, there was no dancing, it wasn’t allowed.
Ike put on a neat show with his guitar and tongue.  His tongue whipped in and out,  like a snake’s tongue with the beat of the music and he held and stroke his guitar handle in a very sexual manner.
Tina had her own show going.  She either had on a very short dress or one with a split up to her thighs.  She and her Ikettes put choreographed well synchronized moves while singing and dancing.
I think when we left, we were panting over keeping up with the high-energy performance. 




SUNDAY FUNNIES!! HUMBUG's Voting Machines



This is from the pages of HUMBUG Magazine in the 1950s.  Illustrated  by Al Jaffee and editor Harvey Kurtzman - ready when you are HK!



Al Jaffee is in his late 90s is still produces very detailed cartoons in MAD magazine..  He is the oldest and the longest running cartonnist of MAD Magazine.

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Saturday, June 29, 2019

Petty Females Early 1950s



Petty Mothers and Daughters in Varnell, Ga. about 1950. My sister Frances is the oldest child in the picture. My mother Janie Petty Hunter is hiding behind Frances.

John and Adeline Woody Petty




GO WEST YOUNG PETTYS! John Franklin and Adeline Woody Petty. John is the son of Elijah Petty and Sarah Parker. Adeline is the daughter of Conrad Raburn and Elizabeth Hunt Woody. Adeline was born in Fannin Counry, Georgia, 1859 and John was born in the same county in 1856.
They were married 1881 in Fannin County. They had ten children.
Here is the only note I have about John:
John received the bulk of his father's estate.

In the book "PROGESSIVE MEN OF WYOMING" They moved to Sand Creek, Laromie County, Wyoming in 1887. Later owning a farm on the Wheatland Flats.
- Gary Griswold
Here is a far fetched thought: John Petty is the brother Daniel Webster Petty. Daniel Webster Petty is the father of William Elijah Joseph Petty (my mother's father). William Elijah Joseph was also born in Fannin County. William Elijah Joseph Petty moved his family to Gillette, Wyoming for a few years. I wonder if Wm Elijah Joseph was aware his uncle John lived in the same state? And if so, is that why he moved there?

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Bluegrass Jamming at Australian Bakery Tuesday Eves

Friday, June 28, 2019

Benjamin and Banjamin Poster

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Throwback Thursday, Philadelphia Navy Hospital




Throwback Thursday – 30 Days in the Philadelphia Naval Hospital.
It appears that I have a Panadol  cyst again.  This is my fourth time with this kind of cyst. 
It reminds me of February or March 1965 of my first Panadol Cyst. 
At NAS Lakehurst, NJ, I had an infected sore-like thing on the end of my tailbone.  It was infected excreting a smelly pus.  The medical department of the base sent me to the Naval Hospital in Philadelphia.
After the operation I was in a open-bay ward with many patients.  After a few days I was moved to another opened-bay ward – but no other person was there.  I had the whole ward to myself.
I had to report to the ward above me twice a day for the medical people to clean and change my bandage and for sitz baths.  With Sitz baths you fill a small tub with hot water, dump some healing stuff into the water and it down.  Usually there were three to five of us.
To earn my keep, so to speak, when I was well enough, I had to sweep down the long lonely bay I was staying alone. 
Since I was the only occupant it was always fairly clean.  A couple times I didn’t get around to sweeping it down and nobody noticed.
At the end of pay, was two patient rooms.  One was a airplane pilot who was in a crash and he was burned to a crisp.    He was covered with bandages.  Only by accident I saw some of his cooked arm when they were changing him.
The other room was an old senile old man who talked out of his head.  The male-nurse told me they had no idea who he was,  he was found on the streets mumbling to himself. .  He was so unfasted he had no body motor controls.  Why was he in a Navy hospital?  Because he probably served in the Navy, based on a tell-tell tattoo.
Both these men reminded me a book I had recently read JOHNNKY GOT HIS GUN by Dalton Trumbo.
I walked into downtown Philadelphia one day.  It was a long walk.  I stopped in a bar for a drink and started talking to an old lady in a Red Cross uniform.  She bought the drinks. And again.
Also, I made friends with one of the male nurses.  We liked the same literature.  He had me over to his apartment one night with dinner for he and his wife. 
The Personnel Office for Officers  had a woman that needed typing help.  I filled her need by doing some typing for her.  We talked about this and that.  In a couple of days she said she did some research and found that after I was released from the hospital  the next week I would have less than 90 days to serve.  They would have to cut me orders to report back to my squadron in Lakehurst or since I will have less than 90 days they can terminate my active duty.
I jumped for joy.
Then I thought about it.  I made some good friendships at Lakehurst and did not like the idea of leaving them and not seeing them again.  And besides I left my co-worker, friend, my car to use while I was in the hospital, so I told they lady “Thanks but no thanks.”

If I knew what was in store for me I possibly  might have had second thoughts.  When I saw my little blue Volvo my friend was keeping for the first thing I noticed was the door was being held on by a rope.  Secondly, I was to be questioned.  I accidentally left the safe opened with tests in it.  A guy by the name of Montgomery stole a test and later during a search the test was confiscated.  It was my fault he had that test, an oversight, but my responsibility anyway.
What got me through that investigation was when questioned Don would get behind me and make faces at the investigating officer.  You would have to have been there.

Quote from the Head Monk:







Dalai Lama said, "Trump has a  lack of moral principle".

Hunter Sister-In-Laws , 1940sw



The Hunter mothers of Marietta in the late 1940s

Left to rightr:  Janie Petty Hunter, Willy Collins Hunter, Jeannetrte Quintal Hunter, Sarah Frasurer Hunter, Lola Jean Turner Hunter and Ruby Langley Hunter

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Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Bluegrass Pictures at Paulding County Senior Center






Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Benjamin at Grant Park

Monday, June 24, 2019

Warren and Byron Prance




These two brothers are Warren Clyde Prance (1915-1945) and Bynon Mayes Prance (1914- ? ). Clyde and Bynon are the sons of Homer Jackson and Cora Louise Smith Prance. Bynon and Clyde are first cousins to Anna's father Henry Paul Prance.
Warren and Clylde were both born in Americus, Sumter County, Georgia.
Bynon married Henrietta McDonald in Savannah and they had three children.
Clyde married Dores Agnes Flanagan in Washington, DC, and had one son.

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