Sunday, December 21, 2008

Have Gun, Will Move



Back in the early years of the United Sates times were wilder. It was a time for survival of the fittest. Differences of opinion and insults were often settled by duals, which were legal.

Also, legal, was having stand-ins. If you were the sickly type but had money you could hire someone to replace you in your duel.

It was truly a time for the survival of the fittest and the bullies. With that in mind, you mind want to take time to reflect, wondering how your family got through those times.

Not long ago I did a posting on Harriet Lance Frady (1838 - ? ). Harriet was the daughter of Samuel Riley Lance (1814 – 1895) and Rebecca Hunter (1812 – 1898). Rebecca was the daughter of my g-g-g-grandfather John Hunter.

Samuel Riley Lance was a stand-in duelist.

A friend of his (Samuel R. Lance), whoes name has long since been forgotten, was to have a duel with a fellow from Union County, and as fate would have it he became sick, not being able to fill the appointed date. Dueling custom has it that if you are sick you have the right to name a replacement, so Samuel Lance, being noted as a fighting man, was chosen to fight in his stead. He came to Union County by request, to uphold the honor of a friend, fought the duel and won, leaving his adversary, against whom he had no malice, lying motionless up the ground.
He came to Union County in the Spring of 1839. He returned to Buncombe County and told his brothers and moved his family one year later.
- From BLOOD MOUNTAIN COVENANT, A SON'S REVENGE pp7-8, by Charles E. Hill.

Now, here is what I am wondering: Who came first to Union County, Georgia, first Sam Riley Lance and his wife Rebecca or Rebecca’s father John?

Union County was opened to the white man about 1832, or shortly thereafter. I think the Indian treaty was void in 1832, when gold was discovered in North Georgia, and after that the white man came.

Someplace I read that it is believed John Hunter built his cabin in the mid 1830s. Sam and Rebecca’s first three children were born in North Carolina, about 1834, 1836, and 1837. Their first child to be born in Georgia (Union County) was 1838.

I am beginning to think John came after his son-in-law and daughter Sam and Rebecca’s recommendation. In other words, did John Hunter and family come after his son-in-law shot and killed and man and say, “Hey, this is a nice place!!

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7 Comments:

Blogger Si's blog said...

Said it before, you need to write a whole series of books on your forefathers, and foremothers, and all their adventures. This one sounds like a whole book all by itself.

4:06 AM  
Blogger ET said...

Si,

Yes, the Lance family is worthy of a book, which has already been done - BLOOD MOUNTAIN COVENANT - A SON'S REVENGE by Charles Hill.

4:35 AM  
Blogger Si's blog said...

Looked it up, ET. Sounds like a good story. Amazon says out of print, but will have to look around some more.

5:10 AM  
Blogger Si's blog said...

Wikipedia needs some update. It has Blood Mountain entry but does not mention your forefathers.

5:21 AM  
Blogger ET said...

Si,
Well, my g-g-g-grandfather, John Hunter's was probably a good mile to a mile and a half north of the base of Blood Mountain.

I think I have Charles Hill's address around someplace. His wife is a descendant of John Hunter and Samuel Riley Lance which means she is also a distant relative of mine.
I have communicated with Charles. He is a retired pharmacist in Blairsville. I looked for his address where I thought it should be and it is not there. I'll be looking for it off and on. I'm sure he will probably have some books available.

5:34 AM  
Blogger ET said...

Si,
I found Charles Hill's address. If you want to check with him about the book availability email me at ethunter@bellsouth.net and I'll give you his address.

6:38 AM  
Blogger Si's blog said...

Will do that. But on our way to the chirruns. After the festivities.

7:01 AM  

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